Todays Superfood: Honeydew

History

The honeydew comes from a family of melons called muskmelons. In America, we refer to this melon as ”honeydew”. However, the true name is a white Antibes. The honeydew melon is grown in California, Arizona, and Texas.

Honeydews “Nutrition Label”

One serving of honeydew, approximately one large wedge contains 48 calories, 12g of carbohydrates, 1g of protein and 0g of fat.

Honeydew contains vitamin C, which keeps our immune system strong, and B vitamins, which provides our cells with energy. Honeydews 90% water content combined with its high potassium hydrates our skin, cells, and body.

Flavor Profile

The flesh of the honeydew is thick and dense, filled with sweet and subtle flavor. The honeydew has a high water content making each bite juicy and refreshing.

Characteristics

Considered a smooth-skinned muskmelon, honeydew contains a waxy white skin. The melon is almost perfectly round and contains a hard exterior. Honeydew is heavy, housing a beautiful flesh. The attractive inside of the melon is pale green with a detailed center arranged of seeds.

When purchasing honeydew, avoid flawed melons with brown sport and fuzzy exteriors.

Opening a Honeydew

Using a large knife, slice the melon in half. The honeydew does not contain a hard center making it easy to slice through. Once the melon is open, use a spoon to scoop out the center seeds and flesh. After all the seeds are removed, slice each half in half. Continue slicing each melon in half until desired size is obtained.

Food Combinations

Honeydew is best eaten raw, as a side to breakfast or for a juicy snack. The mellow yet thirst-quenching flavor of the honeydew makes it a great addition to fresh salads. It also pares well with other fresh fruits and vegetables like strawberries, cucumbers, and cantaloupe.

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